Catastrophic Thinking

“What’s the worst that could happen?”

How often have you asked yourself that question?  It seems that it’s human nature to always go to a worst-case scenario when we’re looking at possible outcomes. Some of us do it because we’re mimicking the thought process our parents followed, others do it because of a bad experience that occurred that you just can’t shake. Or maybe it’s related to anxiety, chronic depression or other mental health issues.

Irregardless of why we think that way, catastrophic thinking is a protective mechanism.  Our thought process becomes –“if I assume the worst will happen, and then when it doesn’t, I feel good about it.” The problem with this logic though is that we are continually focusing on negative outcomes.

We all have the ability to manifest things in our lives, whether you believe you can or you don’t.  The mind is a powerful thing.  It allows you to create your reality.  Whether you are consciously manifesting things or not, your mind goes where your attention is.    What you think about, what you allow your focus to be on, shapes the way that you experience your life. So if you are continually focusing on the worst thing that could happen, you are more apt to have that materialize.

“The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of Hell, a hell of Heaven.”

—John Milton

My challenge to you is to shift your question from “what’s the worst that could happen?” to “what’s the best that could happen?”  Imagine what life would be like if, instead of catastrophic thinking you were to employ fortunate thinking.  How different could your life be?  Would you still have the same levels of anxiety?  Would you see the world in a new light?  There’s only one way to know for sure. Will you accept the challenge?

After all, what’s the best that could happen?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s